Newark Civil Rights Attorney

When your civil rights are violated, do not simply stand by and allow yourself to suffer. Not only can you suffer financially, psychologically, and even physically from a civil rights violation, you send the message that your rights are not important when you choose to keep quiet. Your rights are important, and sometimes, you have to fight to exercise these rights and seek the justice you deserve.

Protecting your Rights During and After an Arrest

Many of your civil rights have to do with interactions with law enforcement. These rights include:

  • Your Fifth Amendment right to avoid self-incrimination by remaining silent. This must be accompanied by notification that if you do speak, your statements may be used as evidence against you later in an investigation;
  • The right to request that an attorney be present during questioning by police;
  • The right to be treated humanely, which means not being subjected to excessive force, not being deprived access to food and water, and not being physically abused while in custody; and
  • Your right to not be held in custody unfairly. Unless you are charged with a crime, you may not be held for an excessive length of time.

Your Right to Live Free from Discrimination

Discrimination in any form is a violation of your civil rights. The home and the workplace are two areas where federal laws specifically prohibit discrimination based on race, sex, religion, national origin, color, and disability. These laws, the Civil Rights Act and the Fair Housing Act, also prohibit retaliation against individuals who take legal action to fight discrimination.

The Fair Housing Act governs the marketing, sale, and leasing of homes. Under this act, landlords and sellers cannot offer different lease or purchase terms to prospective buyers or tenants based on the classes stated above or the buyer or tenant’s family status. Tenants and sellers also may not refuse to rent or sell their property to specific parties or groups as outlined above.

It is also illegal for employers to discriminate against individuals based on the classes above or their age if they are 40 or older. This means employers cannot exclude certain employees or groups from advancement opportunities or subject them to unfair treatment in the workplace.

The First Amendment and Other Constitutional Rights

The First Amendment grants you the right to freely express yourself. Commonly, this is known as freedom of speech. The right to free speech does not mean you can say or do anything at any time without consequences – the government imposes reasonable limits on this right.

Other civil rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution include the right to assemble peacefully and the right to avoid making statements that incriminate you during a criminal investigation or trial.

Work with an Experienced Newark Civil Rights Attorney

If you think your civil rights were violated in any way, you have the right to take legal action to seek justice and in some cases, compensation for your related financial damages. Contact our team of experienced Newark civil rights attorneys at Marshall & Forman, LLC today to schedule your legal consultation in our office.